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"Now I want to give everything a try"

To support more students in Tohoku, donate to Academy Camp from here: https://www.globalgiving.org/13568.  Your donations will be matched 100% by GlobalGiving from March 10th, 11am EST/ March 11th, 12am JST.

To read more stories: http://3yearslater3-11.tumblr.com/

"I don’t hesitate to challenge anything anymore."

To support more students in Tohoku, donate to Academy Camp from here: https://www.globalgiving.org/13568.  Your donations will be matched 100% by GlobalGiving from March 10th, 11am EST/ March 11th, 12am JST.

To read more stories: http://3yearslater3-11.tumblr.com/

"I’m getting better at finding the good in others"

To support more students in Tohoku, donate to Academy Camp from here: https://www.globalgiving.org/13568.  Your donations will be matched 100% by GlobalGiving from March 10th, 11am EST/ March 11th, 12am JST.

To read more stories: http://3yearslater3-11.tumblr.com/

"My new goal: Teach the world about today’s Fukushima"

To support more students in Tohoku, donate to Academy Camp from here: https://www.globalgiving.org/13568.  Your donations will be matched 100% by GlobalGiving from March 10th, 11am EST/ March 11th, 12am JST.

To read more stories: http://3yearslater3-11.tumblr.com/

"I am grateful for the opportunity to help my home country 感謝"

Mari Kuraishi, President, GlobalGiving

"I’m thankful for the many artists who used their talent to raise funds for Japan."

Alison Carlman, Unmarketing Senior Manager, GlobalGiving, 

"I am thankful for the opportunity to thank GlobalGivers for the overwhelming support for Japan - ご支援どうもありがとうございます”

Ever since I became involved in GlobalGiving’s recovery work for Japan in the past two years, I was consistently blown away by the generosity and the overwhelming support from the donors.  I didn’t realize that my country had so much passionate, compassionate, and wonderful supporters around the world.  What I also didn’t realize, until I started this job, was a community of nonprofits that existed/evolved in Japan.  Working with them was a great pleasure, and it was inspirational.

On behalf of GlobalGiving, thank you for letting us do this - a campaign where we can help the local organizations doing amazing work in Tohoku.  The government still can’t lay out a plan to relocate the evacuees, nor a plan out a new energy policy, but there are still many many that help, and the help is needed for much long term.

Mari Seto, GlobalGiving, Program Team

"I’m thankful for the support of rebinding of our community."

Mr. Homma’s story

Mr. Homma is a chairman of the neighborhood association of Kadonowaki. Great East Japan Earthquake on 11th March, 2011 changed the fate of the area. Kadonowaki, which is one of the most suffered areas and 400 people of 4000 dead or missing people in Ishinomaki city fall a sacrifice to the earthquake there. After the earthquake, some people were sacrificed to tsunami and some moved to temporary housing, and only 60 people (23 families) of 2000 people who had been a member of neighbor association of Kadonowaki remained there and the neighbor association had had to suspended activities. However, the activity ran with JEN leaded the association to start again.

He became connected to JEN in October 2012 when about a year and half had passed since the earthquake. At the time, JEN supported “Recovery Program for us” ran by junior high school students in Kadonowaki and looked for a place such as everything was washed away to make flowerpots. After that, Mr. Homma, had being worked for gathering 4 neighbor associations together as a member of “Maneki (Inviting) Community”, and JEN formed “Watering for Flower pots Committee” and moved forward the project with students, habitants and volunteers together. In April 2013, flowers bloomed beautifully with some messages of hope attached. Two years has passed since the earthquake and Mr. Homma said “I am finally ready to recover.” In August 2013, JEN supported the construction of community house, “Maneki House” as a center of interaction of people. Some events such as tea ceremony and exercise class for health are held on a regular basis. Also, festival to praise Jizo (guardian) which had been canceled because of the earthquake and former habitants who had moved to temporary housing came back to the town. Mr. Homma hopes that many people would come back to the town after the land readjustment even if it is only one person.

To support people like Mr.Homma, donate to Japan Emergency NGOs (JEN) from here: https://www.globalgiving.org/7954.  Your donations will be matched 100% by GlobalGiving from March 10th, 11am EST/ March 11th, 12am JST.

To read more stories: http://3yearslater3-11.tumblr.com/

"I’m thankful for being giving the chance to support the local health care systems in the affected areas"

Masayuki

Masayuki Takahashi is a helicopter pilot. After Civic Force was established in 2009, it entered into pre-agreements and partnerships with potential collaborators in preparation for the next large scale disaster. Masayuki was one of the chosen partners Civic Force contacted, hoping to ensure transportation means for emergency relief delivery in case a large scale natural disaster strikes. After 11th March 2011, he engaged in volunteer work by utilizing his helicopter to provide relief supplies for the victims of the disaster with Civic Force. Afterwards he established an organization called All Round Helicopter aiming to support the local health-care system in the area. Local people have been worried about the lack of medical facilities since 2011, so Masayuki and his team decided to put all their efforts behind All Round Helicopter’s activities. Masayuki has received many messages of support and encouragement since establishing the organization.

Masayuki hopes that the survivors can also receive equal health-care service. He and his organization are thankful for any financial support that would contribute to the sustainability of his project.

To support people like Masayuki, donate to Civic Force from herehttps://www.globalgiving.org/8431.  Your donations will be matched 100% by GlobalGiving from March 10th, 11am EST/ March 11th, 12am JST.

To read more stories: http://3yearslater3-11.tumblr.com/

"I am thankful for helping us in regaining our confidence to start in rebuilding our lives"

Hitoshi

Hitoshi used to live a comfortable life from growing vegetables in his own farm located several meters away from the shoreline of Natori City in Miyagi. Unfortunately, the March 11 catastrophe did a major change in his life as his house and main source of income (agricultural machineries and greenhouses) were not spared by the raging eight meter high tsunami.

The high salt concentration of his farm prohibited him from growing vegetables with that of good quality. Because of this, he has to borrow money and invest on renting a piece of land away from the coast to grow broccolis, spinach and cauliflowers. However, despite this decision, his income is still dwindling because the quality of his vegetables are not the same as what he used to grow.In spite of growing it inside the greenhouse, his vegetables are still susceptible from salt damage, strong winds and windblown sands from the sea coast. These are some of the problems that he and the rest of the survivors are facing after the tsunami uprooted and wiped out the coastal vegetation, including the 300 year old black pine trees.

Hitoshi and the rest of the tsunami survivors felt the need to restore the coastal forests for the immediate recovery of their community. Although still suffering from the aftermath of the tsunami,he and the other survivors are working in collaboration with OISCA International, the local and national government of Japan, forest experts and funding agencies.

OISCA International`s experience in collaborative projects become very useful in the implementation of the Coastal Forest Restoration Project in Natori City. Hitoshi is one of the beneficiaries of the scheme of providing an immediate source of income among the tsunami survivors by subcontracting them to grow and raised black pine seedlings needed for the immediate recovery of the 100 hectare coastal land in Natori City.

Unlike the traditional dole out approach in helping the survivors, this scheme encourages a sense of ownership and guarantees a sustainable and long term involvement of the tsunami victims like Hitoshi as they are actively involve in the decision making and actual project implementation. 

To support more farmers like Hitoshi, donate to OISCA Japan from here: http://www.globalgiving.org/14123.  Your donations will be matched 100% by GlobalGiving from March 10th, 11am EST/ March 11th, 12am JST.

To read more stories: http://3yearslater3-11.tumblr.com/

"I am thankful for everyone who will read my book about Miyagi."

Mihoko

This is Mihoko Terada. Mihoko is a volunteer for the Taylor Anderson Memorial Gift Fund. She is the mother of 2 sons and loves to watch her sons’ soccer games. While born in Nagoya, she has been living with her family in Sendai, Miyagi for over 10 years. When the earthquake happened Mihoko and her family were very frightened, but fortunately no one was injured. As soon as the train lines were working, they went back to her hometown of Nagoya to stay with family. When they went back to Sendai her sister worried about the radiation and sent her vegetables from Nagoya. Mihoko still worries about the radiation. She also worries a great deal about the people in Miyagi who lost their homes and family. As part of her volunteer work with the Taylor Anderson Memorial Gift Fund, Mihoko helps a variety of local non-profit groups and schools. For example, she assists in coordinating the building of English book reading corners at schools in Ishinomaki, she guided American students around the disaster zone, and she assisted as a translator in numerous meetings. Mihoko also wrote a great book about Miyagi people’s experiences during 3/11, which was edited by Keith Goldstein of IsraAid, an NGO that also works closely with the Taylor Anderson Memorial Gift Fund with PTSD workshops and a video archive. She very much looks forward to people reading this book, of which half the proceeds will be given as a donation: http://www.amazon.com/The-Disaster-Miyagi-Japan-Earthquake-ebook/dp/B00GEZ0FZA/

Comment: I am thankful for everyone who will read my book about Miyagi.

To support people like Mihoko, donate to Taylor Anderson’s Fund from herehttps://www.globalgiving.org/16397. Your donations will be matched 100% by GlobalGiving from March 10th, 11am EST/ March 11th, 12am JST.

To read more stories: http://3yearslater3-11.tumblr.com/

"I am thankful for a great opportunity to play music with friends."

Ayuka

Ayuka experienced a lot of difficulties after her house near the coast was swept away by the tsunami resulting from the East Japan Great Earthquake, and moved to inland areas within Soma in 2011.  In order to cope with new school environment, she joined the school strings band and became to love do playing viola. Fortunately, with the supports from El Sistema Japan, the band, which used to be in a difficult situation due to lack of instruments and qualified instructors, was revitalized.Today, through her participation in string band activity, she now enjoys playing the viola above all things with a newly established Soma Children’s Orchestra and Chorus.

Ayuka’s comment:

"What I felt after performing at the El Sistema music learning was really amazing. The music was so different between the beginning and end. The crescendo helped me imagine the flow of music and it changed the music totally, which was moving.  Also, I felt like I became closer with my friends when we played the game in the beginning in which we held hands together. My heart was filled with so much gratitude for giving us the opportunity to perform. Since you let us learn music, next time we hope to repay. I am thankful for a great opportunity to play music with friends."

Support students like Ayuka by donating to Friends of El Sistema Japan  from here: http://www.globalgiving.org/14117.  Your donations will be matched 100% by GlobalGiving from March 10th, 11am EST/ March 11th, 12am JST.

To read more stories: http://3yearslater3-11.tumblr.com/

"We are thankful for… giving us opportunities to have a connection with many people through Fukushima Kids."

Kazuki and Yuta

Kazuki and Yuta are university students living in Tokyo. After experiencing the earthquake disaster on March 11th, their perspectives in life changed significantly. Immediately following the earthquake, they did not know what to do, and they were plagued by worries.

About one year after the earthquake disaster, they came across the activities of Fukushima Kids. Up until then, they had a vague desire to do something, and this was the moment when they actually began to act. Through the activities of Fukushima Kids, they met many people throughout society, from middle school and high school children to the elderly, which allowed them to have many experiences and encounter different values and world-views. The most important thing that they gained through these activities was a connection with other people. They could not help but feel a connection with Japanese society and the world.

These young men want to participate in the next activity, and contribute even more to society alongside the people they connected with through Fukushima Kids.

To support more volunteers like Kazuki and Yuta, donate to Fukushima Kids Executive Committee from here: http://www.globalgiving.org/10634. Your donations will be matched 100% by GlobalGiving from March 10th, 11am EST/ March 11th, 12am JST.

To read more stories: http://3yearslater3-11.tumblr.com/

"I’m thankful for the chance for kids in Fukushima to become independent."

Keiko

Keiko is a housewife living in Fukushima, and the mother of two girls. Having experienced the great earthquake of March 11, she learned that life is limited, and has since felt that she should cherish every day that she lives. There were a lot of hard things after the earthquake, but it made her appreciate her neighbors who are helping out each other, and she learned that the world was still full of warm hearts, that the world was still worth living in.

In the fall of last year, she found out about Fukushima Kids. While people all over Japan gradually forgot about Fukushima, the executive council of Fukushima Kids and the many supporters kept working seriously for Fukushima and the children of Fukushima—that brought warmth to her heart. “If I hadn’t participated in this activity, I would never have known that so many people are finding ways to support us—some supporters are elderly, some are small children, some have disabilities, some are struggling themselves in life—if I hadn’t found this out, then I might have been caught in the bitterness of a victim mentality.”

"I think that encouraging the many children of Fukushima with the knowledge that ‘so many people around the world are supporting us’ is an invaluable thing to do."

To support more mothers like Keiko, donate to Fukushima Kids Executive Committee from here:  http://www.globalgiving.org/10634. Your donations will be matched 100% by GlobalGiving from March 10th, 11am EST/ March 11th, 12am JST.

To read more stories: http://3yearslater3-11.tumblr.com/

"I am thankful for givng us hope to see black pine forests along our coastlines."

To support more farmers in Tohoku, donate to OISCA Japan from here: http://www.globalgiving.org/14123.  Your donations will be matched 100% by GlobalGiving from March 10th, 11am EST/ March 11th, 12am JST.

To read more stories: http://3yearslater3-11.tumblr.com/